Jobs & Fellowships

This listing is a service for members of SICB. It is prohibited to use any information posted, including email addresses, to solicit commercial job services or use it for any other kind of commercial activity.

UMass Lowell: Graduate Studentships

(posted 2017-11-01)


The Konow Laboratory (https://konowlab.weebly.com) at UMass. Lowell is inviting applications from prospective graduate students (PhD, MSc) interested in questions at the interfaces between evolutionary biomechanics, comparative muscle physiology and ecological morphology. We hope to hear from enthusiastic and highly motivated individuals interested in graduate work focused on hypothesis-driven tests of questions regarding form-function-mechanics relationships of musculoskeletal systems across the animal kingdom.

We conduct fundamental research on how musculoskeletal specializations enable key ecological transformations across animal evolution, whilst being equally interested in leveraging data from instrumented animal models to inform interventions and therapies against human health problems. Students that are ideally suited for joining our lab are those that share this mosaic of interests. The lab encourages and instills initiative, whilst striking a balance between fostering independence and aiding the development of impactful thesis research that caters to pre-existing skills and developing interests and strengths. A graduate candidature in the lab could involve pre-defined projects (initially) as well as independently developed ideas.

It is an exciting time to get your graduate degree at UMass Lowell. We recently launched the UMOVE initiative, a research center involving labs from all UMass campuses that focus on motion biomechanics research across all levels of biological organization, to inform a benchtop to bedside healthcare approach. UMOVE seeks to transform graduate student training by facilitating transdisciplinary thinking via rotations and workshops in labs whose work spans fundamental biological science, kinesiology, robotics & control engineering, nutrition & biomedical, and biotechnology research. We are also forging collaborative links with mechanical and materials engineering labs on campus.

Our research uses organisms from across the gnathostomes tree of life that are appropriate models for the question(s) we ask. Currently, we have numerous projects underway, including studies of chewing muscle mechanics, mechanics of hard biting (how to avoid fracturing teeth upon brittle food fracture), and mechanics of prolonged chewing (herbivory). We have also embarked on a collaborative program focusing on the interplay between muscle stability and joint integrity in temporomandibular joint disorders.
In the lab (and the field), we use a broad range of experimental modalities, including strain-gauge based measurements of muscle force, sonomicrometry (muscle shape change), electromyography (muscle activation and recruitment), and 3D slow-motion visualization of kinematics, either based on visible or x-ray light (the latter is available at the Concord Field Station, 20 min’s drive from UML). We also use several servo motor systems for in-situ and in-vitro muscle ergometry. Once lab renovations are complete, we will have ample facilities for anatomical quantification (dissection, clear-staining), an electronics workshop, a makerspace and a vivarium dedicated to anamniotes (in addition to the department’s mammal-ready ACF). UML also has great facilities for tissue mechanical testing, and full kinesiology and robotics validation labs. Successful applicants are thus provided with great opportunities for developing a broad-based expertize in experimental, evolutionary-comparative research into structure-function-mechanics relationships. Our proximity to Boston and the biomedical corridor means unrivaled opportunities for interactions with graduate students at nearby laboratories with intersecting research interests.

Interested candidates should first consult the laboratory webpage (http://www.konowlab.weebly.org), and then email Dr. Nicolai Konow (Nicolai_Konow@uml.edu), with (1) a cover letter that details research interests, explains the motivation for graduate work in general, and details the specific fit with the Konow Laboratory, (2) a full curriculum vitae, and (3) unofficial transcripts. We have RA-ships available for exceptional candidates and funding opportunities through TA-ships (stipend and partial tuition waiver support) dedicated to courses we teach. For the sake of independence and development of professional skills, all graduate students in the Konow Lab are encouraged to compete for personal funding via internal and external mechanisms.

We can take students for a January 2018 admission, funded by a TA-ship for Comparative Vertebrate Form and Function but also aim for admissions into the first cycle of our new departmental PhD program (fall ’18). Information about existing Graduate programs we accept graduate students through is at: https://www.uml.edu/Sciences/biology/Programs-of-Study/default.aspxThe Konow Laboratory (https://konowlab.weebly.com) at UMass. Lowell is inviting applications from prospective graduate students (PhD, MSc) interested in questions at the interfaces between evolutionary biomechanics, comparative muscle physiology and ecological morphology. We hope to hear from enthusiastic and highly motivated individuals interested in graduate work focused on hypothesis-driven tests of questions regarding form-function-mechanics relationships of musculoskeletal systems across the animal kingdom.

We conduct fundamental research on how musculoskeletal specializations enable key ecological transformations across animal evolution, whilst being equally interested in leveraging data from instrumented animal models to inform interventions and therapies against human health problems. Students that are ideally suited for joining our lab are those that share this mosaic of interests. The lab encourages and instills initiative, whilst striking a balance between fostering independence and aiding the development of impactful thesis research that caters to pre-existing skills and developing interests and strengths. A graduate candidature in the lab could involve pre-defined projects (initially) as well as independently developed ideas.

It is an exciting time to get your graduate degree at UMass Lowell. We recently launched the UMOVE initiative, a research center involving labs from all UMass campuses that focus on motion biomechanics research across all levels of biological organization, to inform a benchtop to bedside healthcare approach. UMOVE seeks to transform graduate student training by facilitating transdisciplinary thinking via rotations and workshops in labs whose work spans fundamental biological science, kinesiology, robotics & control engineering, nutrition & biomedical, and biotechnology research. We are also forging collaborative links with mechanical and materials engineering labs on campus.

Our research uses organisms from across the gnathostomes tree of life that are appropriate models for the question(s) we ask. Currently, we have numerous projects underway, including studies of chewing muscle mechanics, mechanics of hard biting (how to avoid fracturing teeth upon brittle food fracture), and mechanics of prolonged chewing (herbivory). We have also embarked on a collaborative program focusing on the interplay between muscle stability and joint integrity in temporomandibular joint disorders.
In the lab (and the field), we use a broad range of experimental modalities, including strain-gauge based measurements of muscle force, sonomicrometry (muscle shape change), electromyography (muscle activation and recruitment), and 3D slow-motion visualization of kinematics, either based on visible or x-ray light (the latter is available at the Concord Field Station, 20 min’s drive from UML). We also use several servo motor systems for in-situ and in-vitro muscle ergometry. Once lab renovations are complete, we will have ample facilities for anatomical quantification (dissection, clear-staining), an electronics workshop, a makerspace and a vivarium dedicated to anamniotes (in addition to the department’s mammal-ready ACF). UML also has great facilities for tissue mechanical testing, and full kinesiology and robotics validation labs. Successful applicants are thus provided with great opportunities for developing a broad-based expertize in experimental, evolutionary-comparative research into structure-function-mechanics relationships. Our proximity to Boston and the biomedical corridor means unrivaled opportunities for interactions with graduate students at nearby laboratories with intersecting research interests.

Interested candidates should first consult the laboratory webpage (ww.konowlab.weebly.org), and then email Dr. Nicolai Konow (Nicolai_Konow@uml.edu), with (1) a cover letter that details research interests, explains the motivation for graduate work in general, and details the specific fit with the Konow Laboratory, (2) a full curriculum vitae, and (3) unofficial transcripts. We have RA-ships available for exceptional candidates and funding opportunities through TA-ships (stipend and partial tuition waiver support) dedicated to courses we teach. For the sake of independence and development of professional skills, all graduate students in the Konow Lab are encouraged to compete for personal funding via internal and external mechanisms.

We can take students for a January 2018 admission, funded by a TA-ship for Comparative Vertebrate Form and Function but also aim for admissions into the first cycle of our new departmental PhD program (fall ’18). Information about existing Graduate programs we accept graduate students through is at: https://www.uml.edu/Sciences/biology/Programs-of-Study/default.aspx