SICB Annual Meeting 2009
January 3-7, 2009
Boston, MA

Phylogenetics for Dummies Workshop

Sunday, January 4, 7.30-9.30 pm and Monday, January 5, 5-7 pm

If you are interested in attending please click this link so that we can better gauge the interests and experience levels of the attendees.

The Division of Evolution and Systematic Biology will host the two day workshop "Intro to Phylogenetic Comparative Methods in R" as part of the Phylogenetics for Dummies series. R is a powerful, free(!), high-level statistical computing language with a number of well-developed packages that focus on tree manipulation and comparative analysis. In R it is easy to
  • perform independent contrasts analysis,
  • test for correlation of traits on a tree or across a distribution of tree under many different evolutionary models
  • reconstruct ancestral states
  • examine correlated patterns of trait evolution and lineage diversification,
  • simulate character evolution.
  • create publication-quality plots of trees and graphs
The first day of the workshop will be aimed towards users that are completely new to the language and will cover topics like: R language essentials, getting your data into R, manipulating trees and tip data, printing trees and figures, and calculating independent contrasts. The second session will cover a range of comparative analyses including: Brownian and OU models of character evolution, diversification analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and simulation methods.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own data sets (in nexus and/or csv format) as well as a laptop computer. If you are interested in attending please click this link so that we can better gauge the interests and experience levels of the attendees.

Instructors: Michael Alfaro (UCLA, michaelalfaro at ucla.edu) is an evolutionary biologist studying morphological evolution and species diversification in fishes. Marguerite Butler (University of Hawaii, mbutler at hawaii.edu) studies comparative physiology and morphological evolution in lizards and damselflies and is a contributor to the OUCH package for Ohrnstein-Uhlenbeck analyses in R. Luke Harmon (University of Idaho, ljharmon at uidaho.edu) studies ecological and evolutionary aspects of adaptive radiations and is the author of the GEIGER package for detecting evolutionary radiations in R.